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How to Remove a Tick from a Dog

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Ticks are eight legged insects that, if given the chance, will imbed its head into your dog.  Once attached, they will engorge themselves on your dog’s blood until they’ve had enough, and then drop off.  The problem is that ticks are capable of transmitting a variety of diseases while they are attached.  Of these, the most worrisome is Lyme disease.  Lethargy, fever, and swollen, painful joints are some of the symptoms of this disease.

 

The good news, however, is that regularly checking your dog for ticks can greatly reduce the chances of this disease being transmitted.  The reason for this is that once attached, it takes a full day for the disease to be transmitted.  This is why during tick season (spring and summer) it is a good idea to check your dog regularly.

 

If you find a tick on your dog, what should you do?  The best approach is to use a tick spray, and spray a little on a cotton ball or cloth.  Lightlya picture of a tick dab the tick with the ball (or cloth).  After a few seconds, the tick should start to back out.  If you are wearing gloves, you can then simply grab the tick, squish it, and then flush it down the toilet.  Do not squeeze it without gloves on, however, as you will expose yourself to whatever diseases the tick was carrying.  If you don’t have gloves, grab the tick with tweezers and place it in rubbing alcohol.  It’s not a bad idea to put a little antiseptic on the area where the tick was in order to prevent infection. 

 

There are vaccinations available for Lyme disease.  If you live in tick country, it might be a good idea to talk to your veterinarian about them. 

 

I hope you found this information useful!Click here to go to the Vet Products Direct Website

 

- Grover

 

PS - Vet Products Direct has a variety of flea and tick control products available.  They've been in business since 1999, so they really know their stuff.  To check out their website, click here or on the picture to the right.